Home » Family History » Fifth Great-Grandfather David Scranton: Civilian Life

Fifth Great-Grandfather David Scranton: Civilian Life

David Scranton was born on October 27, 1751 in Durham, New Haven County (currently Middlesex County), Connecticut, the second son and second child of Abraham Scranton and Beulah Seward. He was baptized on November 3, 1751 at Christ Church in Durham, a congregation that still exists as United Churches of Durham.

United Churches of Durham today, which houses the congregation of which David Scranton was a part.  Author's collection.

United Churches of Durham today, which houses the congregation of which David Scranton was a part. Author’s collection.

I will be skipping over his life during the Revolutionary War during this post, to be explored in my next post. So stay tuned!

On April 9, 1781, David took the oath of a freeman in Durham. My guess is that he married Phebe Curtis sometime in mid-1781, definitely before 1782. He and his wife were admitted as members of Christ Church in Durham in early 1782. As I stated in my previous post, their daughter Phebe was born on May 11, 1782 and his wife died on May 30, 1782. I suppose that her death was related to childbirth; perhaps an infection? In any case, she was laid to rest at what is now Old Durham Cemetery and her gravestone is still legible on Find-a-Grave.

David married a second time to Loraine Strong, daughter of Thomas Strong and Phebe Seward, most likely before late 1785, although it could have been sooner, since I am sure David needed help in raising little Phebe. David and Loraine’s first child Sarah was born in Durham on August 11, 1786.

In mid-1787 the family moved to Nova Scotia, as detailed in my post about his daughter Sarah. He was deeded 150 acres farmland and a lot in Boylston, Nova Scotia (which later became Manchester) on August 1, 1787. David’s occupations in Nova Scotia were primarily a mariner (as captain of his own ship) and secondarily a farmer. I suppose the farm helped sustain his family and his work on the ship brought in cash they may have needed.

The children of David and Loraine (all but Sarah born in Manchester):

  • Sarah, born August 11, 1786 in Durham, Connecticut; married John McMasters September 20, 1808; died March 23, 1865 in Manchester
  • Nancy, born February 26, 1788; married Allen Livingston April 28, 1812; died after 1855
  • Thomas Strong, born June 17, 1789; died January 1801 of smallpox
  • Beulah, born March 7, 1790; died March 18, 1804 of scarlet fever
  • Henry, born November 10, 1793; died January 1801 of smallpox
  • Lois Experience, born July 12, 1795; married George McMasters before 1814; died December 15, 1849 of dropsy
  • David, born October 10, 1797; married Lydia Ann Simpson April 23, 1824; died after 1865
  • twins Henry and Thomas, born February 26, 1802
    • Henry died November 1, 1802
    • Thomas, upon his baptism, took on the name Thomas Henry; married Sophia Ann Porper December 18, 1827; died January 8, 1873 of dropsy

David was an active member of the Congregational Church in Manchester since 1808, “having experienced religion (hopefully) in a great revival there”. I would be interested to know more about his role in this church.

David died of old age (I assume) on March 5, 1836 in Manchester as he was dressing himself in the morning. He was laid to rest in Manchester Cemetery, where his gravestone indicates “Captain David Scranton”. Loraine died two years later on November 8, 1838.

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2 thoughts on “Fifth Great-Grandfather David Scranton: Civilian Life

  1. Pingback: Sixth Great-Grandfather Abraham Scranton | Beautiful Water Genealogy

  2. Pingback: Fifth Great-Grandfather Thomas Strong | Beautiful Water Genealogy

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