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U-Turn: Redmans

In the years since I last wrote about my Redman line, I’ve learned more about them and entered that information into my database. And to my horror, I found that I’d mixed up some of my facts in my blog post. So I’ve done a little editing there and will be expanding on the Redmans here.

Starting with the first Robert Redman (“Robert 1”): he seems to have immigrated from England about 1652 and settled in Milton, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. By 1658, he married Luce or Lucy, and their known children were:

  • John
  • Mary, who died April 24, 1669
  • Ann
  • Ruth, who married Walter Everendon
  • Charles, born August 16, 1666; married Martha Hill on February 10, 1688 in Milton; died 1725 in Suffolk County, Massachusetts (I wrote more about his life in my earlier post)
  • Joseph, born October 20, 1668 in Milton, and died May 7, 1669 in Milton
  • Mercy

One interesting fact I learned about Robert 1 was that on February 24, 1672, he sold some land to the town of Milton for a “burying ground”, which is still there today.

Map of Milton Cemetery. Courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Robert 1 wrote his will on December 30, 1678 and he subsequently died on January 13 in Milton. His son John was the executor of his will.

To expand on Charles and his family, I was able to color in more details on his children:

  • Mary, born December 3, 1689 in Milton
  • Martha, born March 27, 1692 in Milton
  • Robert (“Robert 2”), born March 30, 1694 in Milton; married Mary Kenner (or Kennee) on August 1, 1722 in Boston; died November 8, 1760 in Suffolk County, Massachusetts
  • John, born May 8, 1696 in Milton
  • Marcy (or Mercy), born July 8, 1698 in Milton
  • Thankful, born 1700; married George Blackman in 1728; died 1783

I also found out that Charles held the office of constable in 1724 in Dorchester (of which Milton was a part). Not too bad, considering it was the year before his death!

Skipping down to Robert 2, I wrote about how he received a land grant in 1737 in “Dorchester Canada” (now Ashburnham, Worcester County, Massachusetts), but I didn’t know when he might have disposed of it. It now seems that he must have sold it rather quickly: by 1738, Samuel Hayward owned this particular plot of land.

So those are my newest discoveries on the Redman line. I still haven’t hiked on the Punkapoag Trail, but it is on my ancestral bucket list!

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One thought on “U-Turn: Redmans

  1. Pingback: The Redman Legacy | Beautiful Water Genealogy

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