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How I Got Started in Family History

Having read Alex Haley’s “Roots” by age 15, I was kind of fascinated with the idea of tracing my ancestry. How far back could I go? I started by asking my parents and grandparents questions, then I drew my own version of the family tree in an old notebook.

Not knowing anything about genealogical research, I just set aside my family tree for years. Meanwhile, my dad’s sister started to do her own digging into her father’s mysterious ancestors, and she would tell me some of the things that she learned. When she passed away in 2010, my sister gave me a directive when cleaning out my aunt’s apartment: save any family stuff you find!

I couldn’t find any physical paperwork, but I did find some links on her laptop. What could they tell me? Again, the clues were scant, but it was enough to get me curious, and curiosity was all I needed! I’ve been on a rampage to learn more, more, more about all of my forbears!

This Blog

Since I’ve been encouraged by friends and family to get my genealogy “out there”, and as I’ve become more involved in the genealogy community, I’ve decided to blog about it, like so many have done before me. I plan on writing about my ancestors and my other genealogy-related pursuits.

I read somewhere that my maiden name “Pleau” is a variant of “Belleau”, which is French for “beautiful water”. Having grown up with a name that no one can seem to pronounce or spell, and having lived almost all my life on a shoreline town or city, I figured “Beautiful Water Genealogy” would make a perfect name for this blog!

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7 thoughts on “About

  1. I’ve been reading through all the stuff you’ve found on the Markoski family. Great job! I found through e-mail exchanges that your Mom’s memories and mine differ in some areas, and what one of us remembers sometimes the other doesn’t. I also have a few tidbits that may help you along or you might find interesting. Rather than run on here, feel free to contact me at my e-mail address. Thought I had yours, but apparently not.

    Like

  2. Ann Jane lipsett Scranton appears to have adopted her children. She is my great grandmother’s mother, however, she was too old to have actually given birth to her or her siblings. Do you know anything about Ann Jane Lipsett Scranton?
    Thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi! I totally agree that Ann Jane seems to have adopted her children. I don’t know a lot about her, but she was born about 1821 in Clam Harbour or Manchester in Guysborough County, the third child and oldest daughter of Edward Lipsett and Mary Irving (who had immigrated to Nova Scotia from Ireland). She married William Frederick Porper Scranton on June 27, 1870 in Manchester. In the 1871 Census, they had 8-year-old Arthur Morrison living with them. In 1881, their household included 6 year old Flora MacDonald, 27 year old Susan Anderson and 2 year old John Anderson, and a 17 year old African girl named Melva Garaw (not sure of the spelling). In 1891, all under the surname Scranton: 16 year old Flora, 11 year old John and 9 year old Clara. (I haven’t found the 1901 Census yet.) Ann died on January 26, 1907 and is buried in the Manchester Cemetery. John later served in World War I and was killed in action on July 5, 1916.

      That’s all I know so far!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you for your response. Clara was my great grandmother, my mother has some of John’s paperwork, I believe it is his death certificate. As far as we always knew, John Scranton was Clara’s brother. I wonder if Clara was also an Anderson if John Scranton was actually John Anderson. Canadian Census 1901 states that Clara E Scranton, John S Scranton and Annie Scranton are the adopted Children of William and Ann Jane. I am wondering if they could possibly have been “British home children” illegally adopted to work on farms and as servants.
        thanks again

        Liked by 1 person

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