Ninth Great-Grandparents: Job and Abigail (Heard) Clement(s)

As we go back in Margaret Clements‘ line, we see the surname being spelled as Clement. I suppose that back then, surnames were easily adjusted and/or interchangeable (much like Wallington/Wallingford). What’s more confusing is that her father and grandfather had the same first name: Job. I could find a lot of mentions of “Job Clement” in Haverhill, MA and Dover, NH, but because each of their adult lives overlapped for a number of years, it made it difficult to tell which Job was being talked about! So what I’m about to write is what I could tell about Margaret’s father.

Job was born on April 17, 1648 in Haverhill, Essex County, MA to Job Clement and Margaret Dummer. It looks as though the Clement family moved to Dover in what was Norfolk County, MA, but later became Strafford County, NH, between 1652 and 1655. He married Abigail Heard, daughter of James Heard and Shuah _____ on February 26, 1688 in Dover. They lived in the Dover Neck area of town. Job held a few offices in his lifetime: as a representative for the 1692-1693 session and again for the 1693-1694 session (though there is a note that he “refused to take the oaths”. In 1696, Job was moderator at Dover town meetings.

Dover Neck, Dover, NH. Courtesy Google Earth.

Job died on October 3, 1716 in Dover, and his will was proved on October 8, with his wife Abigail and oldest son Job as administrators of his estate.

Abigail lived at least until March 12, 1733, when she quitclaimed some Berwick land to Samuel Lord. I can’t tell when her exact death date was, nor do I know where she or Job are buried.

Eleventh Great-Grandparents: Henry and Bridget (Fitts?) Travers

My last post was about Nicholas Wallington, whose life ended mysteriously at sea in the early 1680s. He had left behind many children and his wife, Sarah Travers. But this wasn’t Sarah’s first mysterious loss in her family, as we shall see.

Sarah’s parents were Henry Travers and Bridget _____ (believed – but unproven – to be Fitts). Henry was born in England sometime before 1610. After March 24, 1634, he traveled aboard the Mary and John and ended up in Agawam (now Ipswich), Massachusetts. By 1635 Henry was living in Newbury, where I assume he married Bridget*. They ended up having two children:

  • Sarah, born 1636; married Nicholas Wallington on August 30, 1654 in Newbury.
  • James, born April 28, 1645; married Mercy Pearce on April 8, 1667 in Gloucester, Essex County, Massachusetts; died before 1717. (At some point, James started using the surname “Travis”.)

There seemed to be some trouble in Henry and Bridget’s marriage: on September 29, 1646, John Emery (another collateral relative of mine) was fined or “to be whipped” for “his miscarriage with the wife of Henry Traverse”, and he was “bound to good behavior and not to frequent the company of the wife of Henry Traverse. Brigett Traverse fined 10s for her misdemeanors”. What?! How long was that going on, I wonder! And I have to note that John was married as well.

Not two years later, on July 26, 1658, Henry drew up his will. He ominously stated that he was going “to sea and know not whether I shall live to Com againe”. He and Bridget must have kept up some sort of correspondence, for she later stated that she last heard from Henry in 1650. At that point, daughter Sarah was only fourteen and son James was five.

Snippet of the beginning of Henry Travers’ 1648 will. Don’t you just love the handwriting? Courtesy AmericanAncestors.org.

This is where Bridget’s story ramps up. In 1655 (a year after Sarah got married), she petitioned the court in Ipswich to allow her to live in her present house until James turned twenty-one. She apparently had been working hard, as she went into debt in keeping up her buildings and breaking up the land. Perhaps things got easier once she married Richard Window in Gloucester on March 30, 1659.

Life was probably stable for Bridget until Richard died on April 27, 1665. Again, Bridget headed to court on May 23 and June 26, 1666 regarding her inheritance from Richard’s will. She stated that she only received “30s. per year, she being now aged and not able to work for her maintenance, and James Stephens, the overseer, not providing her even with bread or beer.” The court ended up granter her petition of May 23 (for how much, I don’t know), and for June 26th’s petition, she received a cow. I suppose that Bridget was satisfied with this arrangement, because I don’t see any further petitions. I have to give her credit for doing what she could to make sure that she and her family were provided for!

At last, Bridget passed away in Bradford, Essex County, MA on October 9, 1673, with her will being proved on November 25 of that year. For some reason, it was another two years (November 26, 1675) before administration of her estate was granted to her son James and son-in-law Nicholas. I don’t know how much she had to leave to her family, but it’s nice to know that in the end, she had something!

* Some sources believe that Bridget was previously married to a Richard Goodwin, but Robert Charles Anderson (author of NEHGS’ Great Migration series) discounts this marriage.

Tenth Great-Grandparents Nicholas and Sarah (Travers) Wallington

Going so far back in time, there are a few theories out there as to when Nicholas Wallington was born and who his parents were, but I don’t have a very high confidence in them at this point. Also, I realize that there are some records and indications of Nicholas’ various dealings in his life that I have yet to research. The following is what I know so far.

It looks like as a boy, Nicholas arrived in Boston, Suffolk County, MA from Southampton, England on April 24, 1638 aboard the Confidence. He was likely a servant to Stephen Kent, who eventually settled in Newbury, Essex County, MA. Nicholas eventually was no longer a servant and married Sarah Travers, daughter of Henry and Bridget Travers, on August 30, 1654 in Newbury.

1663 finds Nicholas and family living in Rowley, Essex County, MA. In 1670, he became a freeman (not a “free man” from being a servant, but a citizen in good standing and able to vote). On November 26, 1675, he became co-administrator of his mother-in-law’s will. I suppose this demonstrates the level of trust that his extended family had in him.

From what I can gather, Nicholas and Sarah had a great number of children:

  • John, born September 16, 1655; died January 6, 1656
  • Nicholas, born January 2, 1657; married Elizabeth Palmer, December 4, 1678; died May 10, 1682
  • John, born April 7, 1659 in Newbury, Essex County, MA; married Mary Tuttle on December 6, 1687 in Dover, Rockingham County, NH; died 1709
  • Sarah, born May 20, 1661; married Caleb Hopkinson, November 25, 1679
  • Mary, born August 20, 1663
  • James, born October 6, 1665; married Deborah _____
  • Hannah, born November 1667
  • William, born February 7, 1670
  • Joseph, born April 20, 1672
  • Elizabeth, born June 23, 1674
  • Esther, born June 8, 1676
  • Benjamin, born June 27, 1678
  • Abigail, born June 24, 1680

The most interesting thing I find about Nicholas is his mysterious death. Every source tells me that he was taken captive and died at sea. I don’t know what prompted him to travel or how anyone found out he was taken captive. In any event, his probate was opened on March 28, 1682 and was not closed until 1703 I suppose that the circumstances of his death and his large number of children contributed to this long period.

Meanwhile, Nicholas’ wife Sarah moved on in her life. On May 18, 1691, she married Onesiphorus Marsh as his third wife. Onesiphorus, according to his gravestone, died on May 15, 1713 and is buried in Pentucket Cemetery in Haverhill, Essex County, MA. I don’t know where Sarah is buried.

We’ll take one more step back through Sarah’s line just to find another mystery!

Ninth Great-Grandparents John and Mary (Tuttle) Wallingford

John Wallingford was the third child (and the second named John!) of Nicolas Wallington* and Sarah Travers.  He was born in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts on April 7, 1659.

John married Mary Tuttle (daughter of John Tuttle and Mary _______) on December 6, 1687 in Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire.  Though married in New Hampshire, it appears that they remained in Essex County, Massachusetts.

Their children were:

  • John, born December 14, 1688; married Charity _______; died between October 16, 1761 and January 27, 1762
  • Nicholas, born October 28, 1691; married Rachel _______; died between 1715 and April 14, 1719
  • Sarah, born December 29, 1693; married Joshua Roberts
  • Ebenezer, born September 30, 1695; never married; died between August 19 and September 6, 1721
  • Thomas, born July 28, 1697 in Bradford, Essex County, Massachusetts; married Margaret Clements, 1717; died August 4, 1771 in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire
  • Judith, born March 16, 1699
  • Abigail, born September 27, 1702

John spent some time in the Essex North Regiment in 1690, but I don’t know if he ever participated in battle.

Abraham Adams House, built circa 1705-1707, contemporary to when the Wallingfords lived in Newbury. Courtesy Wikipedia.

There is an empty probate packet in Essex County, Massachusetts dated April 4, 1709.  I don’t know if this is John’s death date or will date, but I’m sure he died sometime around then. 

*For some unknown reason, John began to use the surname Wallingford.

Eighth Great-Grandparents: Thomas and Margaret (Clements) Wallingford

Way back on June 19, 2016, I mentioned that my seventh great-grandfather James Goodwin had married Margaret Wallingford. Since that time, I’ve been exposed to some of the awesome work of the Great Migration study on AmericanAncestors.org, which has led me to more ancestors and more stories. Today, I’ll pick up the story with Margaret’s parents, Thomas Wallingford and Margaret Clements; and again, the information is to the best of my knowledge.

Thomas was born July 28, 1697 in Bradford, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the youngest son and fifth child of John Wallingford and Mary Tuttle.

On March 2, 1716, Thomas bought land from Daniel Gordon of Kingston, NH; I assume this land was in Dover, Strafford County, New Hampshire, because the following year he married Margaret Clements (daughter of Job Clements and Abigail Heard) there. They subsequently went on to build their family. The following are Thomas’ children that are ascribed to Margaret:

  • Margaret, born in Dover; married James Goodwin, circa 1740; died February 1803 in Berwick, York County, Massachusetts (now Maine)
  • Hannah, born May 5, 1720; married _____ Brown
  • Judith, born March 25, 1722
  • Ebenezer, born July 21, 1724; married Mary Wentworth
  • Abigail, born September 30, 1726; married Edward Sanders

It was sometime after Abigail’s birth that Margaret died, for by February 18, 1728 Thomas had remarried a woman by the last name of Pray (some assume her name was Mary).

At this point, Thomas’ public life began to pick up, He was a selectman in Dover for various years between 1733 and 1748. He also served as a representative in the colonial assembly between 1739 and 1748. One interesting story I found was that during a session on February 13, 1744, “Cyprian Jeffrey, of Portsmouth, storekeeper, made an assault upon him and drawing his knife said ‘he would cut his (Wallingford’s) throat, if he got forty men to do it.’ ” Jeffrey was arrested but later, when Thomas complained of the attack to the House, admitted his wrongdoing. Thomas forgave him after Jeffries paid “costs”. What precipitated all this, I have no idea!

In 1748, Thomas took the most significant office of his life: judge of the Superior Court in Dover. The FamilySearch Wiki seems to indicate that there are no court records archives prior to 1773, so I don’t know if I’d ever be able to see what kind of cases he was involved with.

By 1755, Thomas was married yet again to Elizabeth (Swett) Prime. Supposedly Elizabeth was the inspiration for naming the land on which they lived: “Madam’s Cove”. This land was along the Newichawannock River (today, the Salmon Falls River), kind of across from the mouth of the Great Works River.

Thomas died on August 4, 1771 in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, NH at “Capt. Stoodley’s”. Though I couldn’t pin down exactly who Capt. Stoodley was, I strongly believe that it might have been James Stoodley who ran a tavern in Portsmouth (which still stands and has been moved to the Strawbery Banke Museum campus). After all, it makes sense that this would be a place that Thomas could stay in Portsmouth if he had business there.

Stoodley’s Tavern. Courtesy Library of Congress

Thomas was buried on August 6 in what is now the Old Town Cemetery in Rollinsford, Strafford County, New Hampshire. His wife Elizabeth was also buried there, having died on December 3, 1810.

I was surprised to read that Thomas died intestate, for he had a lot of land throughout New Hampshire and what is now Maine. It seems that my ancestor, Margaret (Wallingford) Goodwin, inherited quite a bit of land in New Hampshire and in Berwick, York County, Massachusetts. (I wonder how she ultimately disposed of all that land?) There is a good summary of his extensive estate was divided here, but it would be good to look at these records myself someday.

One significant point I want to make is that these records reveal that Thomas was a slaveholder. His estate reveals four names:

  • Richmond
  • Phillis
  • Dinah
  • Cato

I don’t think that these slaves were ever freed, although it’s believed that Cato actually fought in the Revolutionary War.

U-Turn: Redmans

In the years since I last wrote about my Redman line, I’ve learned more about them and entered that information into my database. And to my horror, I found that I’d mixed up some of my facts in my blog post. So I’ve done a little editing there and will be expanding on the Redmans here.

Starting with the first Robert Redman (“Robert 1”): he seems to have immigrated from England about 1652 and settled in Milton, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. By 1658, he married Luce or Lucy, and their known children were:

  • John
  • Mary, who died April 24, 1669
  • Ann
  • Ruth, who married Walter Everendon
  • Charles, born August 16, 1666; married Martha Hill on February 10, 1688 in Milton; died 1725 in Suffolk County, Massachusetts (I wrote more about his life in my earlier post)
  • Joseph, born October 20, 1668 in Milton, and died May 7, 1669 in Milton
  • Mercy

One interesting fact I learned about Robert 1 was that on February 24, 1672, he sold some land to the town of Milton for a “burying ground”, which is still there today.

Map of Milton Cemetery. Courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Robert 1 wrote his will on December 30, 1678 and he subsequently died on January 13 in Milton. His son John was the executor of his will.

To expand on Charles and his family, I was able to color in more details on his children:

  • Mary, born December 3, 1689 in Milton
  • Martha, born March 27, 1692 in Milton
  • Robert (“Robert 2”), born March 30, 1694 in Milton; married Mary Kenner (or Kennee) on August 1, 1722 in Boston; died November 8, 1760 in Suffolk County, Massachusetts
  • John, born May 8, 1696 in Milton
  • Marcy (or Mercy), born July 8, 1698 in Milton
  • Thankful, born 1700; married George Blackman in 1728; died 1783

I also found out that Charles held the office of constable in 1724 in Dorchester (of which Milton was a part). Not too bad, considering it was the year before his death!

Skipping down to Robert 2, I wrote about how he received a land grant in 1737 in “Dorchester Canada” (now Ashburnham, Worcester County, Massachusetts), but I didn’t know when he might have disposed of it. It now seems that he must have sold it rather quickly: by 1738, Samuel Hayward owned this particular plot of land.

So those are my newest discoveries on the Redman line. I still haven’t hiked on the Punkapoag Trail, but it is on my ancestral bucket list!

Maternal-Side Christmas: Christmas Eve

My maternal grandparents (Bruno and Viola (Biliunas) Markoski) lived on the other side of the state, so I don’t think I ever saw them at Christmas time. However, my mom carried on the Polish tradition of pierogies on Christmas Eve.

Being good Catholics, we were not to eat meat on Christmas Eve, so the Polish often made pierogies for dinner. Folks would later ask me, “Were they stuffed with potatoes?” I’d never heard of such a thing! My mom’s family made their pierogies stuffed with farmer’s cheese (which is kind of like ricotta) or kapusta (a sauerkraut mixture). (Personally, I prefer the cheese-stuffed pierogies slathered with melted butter spooned over them!)

Cheese pierogies on the top, kapusta on the bottom! Author’s collection.

Both my sisters have made pierogies, as well as a few of my first cousins on that side of the family (as reported on Facebook). Me? I do have my mom’s recipe, but I’ve never made them. Maybe someday! For now, I’m enjoying everyone else’s!

My side of the family continues this cooking tradition, as well as opening presents on Christmas Eve. It all started with our opening the gifts from our parents on Christmas Eve (which included the obligatory matching jammies that we’d put on that night), then Santa gifts on Christmas Day. As we got older, the Santa gifts faded away, and we were just left with Christmas Eve. Usually, we had the Mormon Tabernacle Choir singing classics in the background as each of us took turns opening our gifts. When my dad was alive, and if we were really lucky, he’d play some Christmas songs on the cornet. He had a really awesome tone! (And yes, I would say he inherited his musicality from his ancestors!)

We continue these traditions to this day on the years we have Christmas with my side of the family. For my own family (husband and kids), we have our own presents on Christmas morning as well as a yummy Christmas dinner on a table with Great-grandmother Bertha’s tablecloth and my aunt Cheryl’s silverware set that Great-grandmother Eva gave her.