Honor Roll Project: Norwalk, CT – World War I (part 5)

In recognition of those who have served our country in the military, Heather Wilkinson Rojo of the Nutfield Genealogy blog started the Honor Roll Project. It’s an opportunity to publicly document the names on military memorials around the world, thus making them easily searchable on the internet for people who are looking for them!

WWI Memorial on the Norwalk Green. Author’s collection.

This is a continuation of the names on the World War I memorial on the green in Norwalk, CT (previous posts are here, here, here and here). Below is the fifth panel and its transcription.

World War I Memorial. Norwalk, CT. Author’s collection.

1917 – THE WORLD WAR – 1919

IRELAND WILLIAM D. KATZ ELIAS KUNZE JOHN A. JR. LOCKHART JOSEPH MARRON HUGH P.
IRVINE RICHARD H. KEARNEY JAMES EDWARD KURIMAI GABRIAL LOCKWOOD ALAN E. MARTIN FRANCIS R.
IRVING JOHN L. KEELER ANSON F. KUSLIK JOSEPH LOCKWOOD FRANK R. MARTINEZ BENICNO
ISRAEL CHARLES KEELER BENJAMIN A. KVANCZ JOHN LOCKWOOD MANICE DEF. JR. MARUCA JOSEPH
ISRAEL MURRAY J. KEISLER GEORGE A. LOMBARD ANTHONY MASI JAMES V. JR.
KEISLER HARRY W. LOMBARDI JAMES JR. MASTROBERARDINO M.
KELLEY ARTHUR G.

L

LONCHAK ALEXANDER MATHEIS CHARLES L.

J

KELLEY JAMES MERRITT LAMB ROBERT T. LOUDEN ARTHUR JOSEPH MATHER WILLIAM F.
JACKSON OLIVER RAY KELLEY JAMES W. LANDERS FREEMAN LOUDEN CLARENCE A. MATHEWSON GEORGE T.
JACKSON WILLIAM S. KELLEY JOHN E. LANE ARTHUR B. LOUDON ALLEN W. MATTHEWS JOHN J.
JAMES GEORGE L. KELLEY JOHN L. JR. LANE GEORGE L. LOUDON CHARLES H. MAY JOHN FREDERICK
JAMES RUSSELL KELLY THOMAS PATRICK LANE HENRY M. LOUDON IRWIN MAYER HARRY S.
JARVIS GEORGE KELLY WINTON F. LANE HERBERT F. LUCAS CHRIS JOHN MAZZONE SALVATORE
JARVIS HARVEY KELMKYWITCH GEORGE LATHAM GEORGE W. LUMPP BENJAMIN MCALLISTER EDWARD C.
JASSIL JOHN KEMP WILLIAM B. LATHAM HARRY NELSON LYDEN HENRY MCCANN CHRISTOPHER S.
JENNINGS CLIFFORD N. KENNEDY WILLIAM B. LAWRENCE PAUL LYDEN J. JOSEPH MCCARTHY CHARLES D.
JENNINGS FRED S. KENNEY CHARLES B. LAWSON FRANK JOSEPH LYDEN MARTIN A. MCCARTHY CLARENCE F.
JENNINGS JAMES W. KENT JAMES S. LAYDEN ERNEST J. LYDEN THOMAS M. MCCARTHY EDMUND J.
JENSEN FRANK L. KENT JOHN J. LAYDEN JOHN E. LYNCH CLARENCE H. MCCARTHY WALTER
JESSUP LOUDEN KEOGH JOHN J. LEE JOHN JAMES LYNCH JAMES MCCARTHY WILLIAM F.
JOHNSON ARCHIE B. KEREKES STEPHEN J. LEFFERSON WILLIAM E. LYNCH JOHN J. MCDONALD THOMAS J.
JOHNSON CHARLES KIGGINS IRA H. LEGG FRANK A. LYONS JOSEPH MCELFISH RUSSELL C.
JOHNSON ERNEST W. KINDILIEN EDWARD J. LEGG WILLIAM RALPH LYONS MICHAEL J. MCGANN WILLIAM J.
JOHNSON FRANCIS S. KISKA LOUIS J. LEHOTSKY JULIUS D. MCGARRIE JOHN J.
JOHNSON JOHN B. KLEIN FREDERICK J. LEMAIRE LOUIS A. JR. MCGLONE THOMAS
JOHNSON LEONARD A. KLEIN WILLIAM J. LENGYEL JAMES J.

M

MCGLONE WILLIAM J.
JOHNSON OSCAR A. KLIPPEL CHARLES LENT ARTHUR F. MACE CHARLES MCGOWAN EDWARD B.
JOHNSON OSCAR E. KNAPP ERNEST E. LEONARD JAMES P. MACKAY JOSEPH MCGRATH MATHEW
JOHNSON WALTER J. KNIFFEN OTIS A. LEPIRA ANTONIO MACY RALPH MCGUIRK FRANK J.
JOHNSON WESLEY C. KOCHER JACOB P. LEPPERT CHARLES L. MAESTICIANI RALPH MCILHONEY JAMES E.
JONES JESSE KOCHER KARL H. LETIZIO JOSEPH M. MAGNER CLETUS MCLAUGHLIN LEWIS JOHN
JOSEM JACOB EDWARD KOENIG ADAM LEUR HENRY MAHON JAMES E. MCLAUGHLIN THOMAS
JOST JOSEPH ANTHONY KOENIG CARL LEWIS HENRY HUNT MALVASO ANTHONY MCLELLAN HAROLD F.
JOYCE FRANCIS J. KONTAGIANNIS LOUIS A. LEXEN EUGENE E. MANEK JOHN P. MCMAHON EDWARD M.
JULESON JOSEPH KOPSCO MICHAEL L’HOMMEDIEU EARLE B. MANOS WILLIAM MCMAHON FRANK V.
JUVENAL ANTHONY B. KRIMBILL ANDREW C. LIBNER ISADORE MANSFIELD CHARLES MCMAHON JAMES M.
JUVENAL WILLIAM W. KRUSCH WILLIAM T. LIBNER JACOB MANSFIELD CLIFFORD MCMAHON JOHN F. JR.
KUBAN DAVID ANTHONY LIBNER JOSEPH MANSFIELD HAMILTON D. MCNERNEY WILLIAM J.
KUBAN JOHN LICARI VITO L. MANZI RALPH MCNIVEN WILLIAM A.

K

KUCH C. FRED JR. LIGHT FREEMAN MANZI SALVATORE MCQUILLAN VINCENT J.
KANE JOHN KUCH EDWARD J. LIST JOHN MARINO JOSEPH A. MCREDMOND WILLIAM H.
KAPLAN ALEXANDER KUHN LOUIS LITTLEJOHN CRAIG MARRON ANTHONY J. MCSALLY EDWARD JOSEPH

“WE HONOR THOSE WHO DO US HONOR”

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New York State Family History Conference, Part 2: All the Learning

In my last post, I covered my general experience at the New York State Family History Conference. This time I will be writing about highlights from the classes and talks I attended.

Plenary Session

Friday was opened by a “plenary session” (which I had to look up: it’s the big meeting that everyone goes to). Joshua Taylor, President of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, officially welcomed everyone to the conference. He gave out two awards: the “Empire State Service Award” to Jennifer Liber Raines and the “Professional Service Award” to Susan R. Miller, for all her hard work at the conference.

Joshua then announced a new project that NYG&B was spearheading: the New York Land Records Project. This project involves the indexing of New York state land records on FamilySearch, a huge undertaking considering New York’s historic population. Click here for more information if you want to get involved!

President Joshua Taylor addresses the crowd. Author’s collection.

We were then introduced to the session’s main speaker, David Nicholson, head of Living DNA. David introduced the team members who came with him: Katie Welka from Canada, and Diahan Southard, who cartwheeled her way up the aisle! David spoke of Living DNA’s hopes to make DNA analysis more intuitive and more interactive. Some of their future tools are still in development, but look pretty exciting and accurate! Keep your eyes on this company!

MyHeritage Lunch

Knowing how MyHeritage is usually on the cutting edge of technology developments in genealogy, I signed up for their Saturday luncheon talk, “Genealogical Records in the Path of Destruction & Neglect – Past, Present & Future” by Mike Mansfield. Mr. Mansfield basically reviewed the well-known devastating losses (i.e. the 1890 Census) over the course of history, as well as data losses due to changes in languages, culture and technology. He made the very valid conclusion that each of us should be sure to document our own records and family history and to share it with others.

The Classes

Unlocking Roman Catholic Records on Findmypast – Jen Baldwin

  • Free Irish Catholic records! Author’s collection.

    There are lots of new records coming online onto Findmypast. Jen is working hard with diocese all over the country to get records online.

  • Catholic records from Ireland are free with a free account.
  • If you’re a member of the NYG&B, Findmypast North American records are free!

A Tour of Upstate New York Genealogical Research Repositories: Some Gems – Jane E. Wilcox

  • This was a sampling of museums, libraries, historians, and special collections, most of which Jane had visited herself.
  • A good online repository: New York Heritage

Genealogy and Maps – Philip Sutton

  • Philip is from the New York Public Library. The Map Division is in Room 117 at the main library, but there is a LOT online!
  • Philip demonstrated NYPL’s Map Warper, which is a really cool tool!

Using Geo-Tech Tools to Answer New York Research Questions – Frederick Wertz

  • Frederick showed us some common and uncommon map tools: Google Earth Pro, Arcgis.com (a paid site), GNIS.
  • Be familiar with the historical area before you research the map.
  • Research trip tip: note repositories on your online map software.

Converting a Bunch of Information into a Credible Conclusion – Thomas W. Jones

  • Thomas’ main point was creating an “assemblage” of information, which you analyze and correlate to come to conclusion. (Especially good when facts aren’t specifically spelled out.)

Writ in Stone: Cemeteries and Genealogy – Judy G. Russell

DNA and the Genealogical Proof Standard – Blaine T. Bettinger

  • Blaine made the relationship between these two concepts so much easier than it sounds.
  • DNA provides direct evidence of a genetic relationship and indirect evidence of a genealogical relationship.
  • If DNA is not available for whatever reason, consider it a “burnt courthouse”.

New York Records and Resources at FamilySearch – Cherie Bush

Outstanding Long Island Research Repositories and Resources – Terry Koch-Bostic

  • Honestly, there were so many resources; I

    Terri Koch-Bostic. Author’s collection.

    took 4 pages of notes!

  • Terry said that the best resource to start with was the NYG&B Gazetteer.

Documentation: The What, Why, Where and How – Thomas W. Jones

  • Documentation is not just the product, but the process as well.
  • The essence of documentation is: the who, what, where in, where is, and when.

Uncharted Waters: Diving into the Holdings of the New York State Archives – Jane E. Wilcox

  • It’s important to know that that the New York State Archives & Library had a devastating fire in 1911, though some records and some partial records were saved.
  • The NYS Archives seems to be organized much like NARA: each record set has a series number.
  • Use the finding aids.

By the end of the conference, I was spent! But it was so worth it. The next NYSFHC will be September 10-12, 2020 in Albany. Will you be there?

New York State Family History Conference, Part 1: All the Feels

When I first heard that the New York State Family History Conference (NYSFHC) was going to be in Tarrytown, NY in 2018, I said to myself, “I’m going!” and I kept a sharp eye out for details to be released. After all, it is within driving distance from my house – all I would have to pay is the conference fee!

Finally, the conference arrived on September 13 – 15. I didn’t sign up for any pre-conference workshops or tours, but I was okay with that.

The Venue

NYSFHC, put on by the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society, was held at the Doubletree Hotel in Tarrytown, right along the Hudson River (and I did not take time to take in the views, but I’ve seen the river plenty of times). For those who attended NYSFHC and stayed in the hotel, I’m sure it was super-convenient. The hotel had its own restaurant, but it seemed to me (the one time I ate there) that it was not used to handling a conference crowd. There were no other restaurants located conveniently nearby; having food trucks would have been fantastic!

The space that the conference was held in was sufficient. Classrooms were (usually) not too crowded, though for the smaller rooms you had to get there early enough to ensure you had a seat. A couple of rooms were either too cold or too warm, but this Goldilocks was prepared by wearing a blazer! The main exhibit hall was a bit crowded at times, but there was always the option of checking out the exhibitors/vendors out in the hallway.

Old Friends/New Friends

You’ll read in other blogs that the unique part of a conference experience is interacting and networking with others in person. That is so true!

I was feeling a little shy when I first arrived, but then I reached the exhibit hall and saw Jen Baldwin at the FindmyPast booth right away. She recognized me immediately from when we met at the Global Family Reunion and greeted me with a hug! Once again, the FindmyPast booth was a great place for home base.

Jen Baldwin at the Findmypast booth. Author’s collection.

Another touchstone was the OldMaps booth, where fellow Virtual Genealogical Association member Sara Campbell was handing out VGA ribbons for our badges. Little did I know, I’d actually met Sara two years before at a New England geneabloggers meet-up! At NYSFHC, I was tasked with taking a VGA group picture (which turned out to be two), and Sara helped redirect members outside of the exhibit hall for the pictures.

Meeting some of the other VGA members (Susan Schuler, Kim Cotton, Gail Gannotti, Carol Poulos, Karen Ramon, Ellen Healy, Jo Henn, Eva Kujawa from Sweden, and Marian B. Wood, who I’d heard speak a few months before) was awesome! Contrary to the conference being New York-based, these folks were from all over the world! And here we were, virtual members meeting together in person.

Virtual Genealogical Association meet-ups. Author’s collection.

But of course, I was most excited to meet up with my peeps from #genchat – complete with the #genchat selfie sign, created by Jenna Mills! There were a few people I knew would be there, based on Twitter feedback (like Jen & some VGA folks), and others that I was pleasantly surprised to see, like Molly Charboneau (who I met at the 2014 Genealogy Event) and Michael Cassara (aka @digiroots). Ironically Friday night was also a #genchat night, so meeting at the conference was a nice reminder to everyone that #genchat was still around!

Jen Baldwin, and me with Jen! Author’s collection.

Jo Henn. Author’s collection.

Molly Charboneau and Michael Cassara. Author’s collection.

Susan Schuler and Kim Cotton. Author’s collection.

Diahan Southard and Marian Wood. Author’s collection.

A Word About Badges & Ribbons

Now, I know that at conferences, you get ribbons to put at the bottom of your badge, but I didn’t know much about how you got them or why. I did have #genchat ribbons to give out to the #genchat folks, and I knew I was entitled to a VGA ribbon. I picked up a few that I knew I qualified for. (One guy I spoke to thought that I was a professional since I had “so many ribbons.”) What I didn’t know was I could actually get a lot more!

I found out from Jen via Twitter that “Ribbons are essentially free marketing… of course we all want our logos carried around by attendees and on social media. So in most cases, it’s a free for all. Each attendee can choose to be a part or not.” I guess if you’re in doubt whether or not you can have a ribbon, just ask!

Ribbon-decked badge! Author’s collection.

In my next post, I’ll be highlighting the talks I attended and what I learned.

Let Freedom Ring 2018

Readers of this blog know that I love Norwalk’s “Let Freedom Ring” program. I love its focus on the true origins of Independence Day, on Norwalk’s part in the American Revolution, and on bringing today’s community together. This year was no exception; in fact, we probably had our biggest crowd yet!

The program opened with Madeleine Eckert of the Norwalk Historical Society giving a talk called “Discovering 18th Century Norwalk Black History.” She and her husband Ed have done extensive research into Norwalk’s black population in the 1700s: from simple census counts to identifying names in probate records (either first, last, or both) to newspaper accounts. Mrs. Eckert then went into detail about Norwalk blacks who not only assisted the Patriot cause during the American Revolution, but also those who became loyalists.

NHS President Diane Jellerette introduces Madeleine Eckert. Author’s collection.

Information was coming at me so fast that it was hard to capture it all. Basically, there were some blacks who served as soldiers in integrated troops. Some slaves also helped save homes during the 1779 Burning of Norwalk. I did manage to capture the names of the black patriots:

  • Ned Negro
  • John Roger
  • Solomon Soutice
  • Onesimus Brown (there was a photo of him!)
  • Dover St. John

Those who supported the Loyalist cause probably did so under the promise of gaining freedom (in fact, they were included among those who received land grants in Nova Scotia). Some Norwalkers included:

  • Catherine
  • Moses
  • Pleasant Lockwood
  • David Raymond
  • Dorras Scudder
  • Cato Cannon

What an eye-opening talk it was!

After a short break, the “Let Freedom Ring” ceremony began. Mayor Harry Rilling spoke of his favorite passage in the Declaration of Independence (“we hold these truths to be self-evident…”). Senator Bob Duff emphasized that the Declaration was “not a love letter” but a list of grievances, and that we too should speak up and make our voices heard in government.

Mayor Rilling and Senator Duff. Author’s collection.

Town Clerk Rick McQuaid, in traditional Revolutionary garb, read many excerpts of the Declaration of Independence (I swear, he does it better every year!). The children present were then invited to help ring the bell as Mayor Rilling read off the names of the thirteen original states.

Rick McQuaid reads the Declaration; children help ring the bell. Author’s collection.

Zachary Anderson, Nathan Brenn and Richie Cordero, three graduates from Norwalk High School’s music program, performed a moving rendition of the National Anthem.

The National Anthem is performed. Author’s collection.

We were then introduced to our special guests, the Sable Soldiers. Ludger Balan told us that day they were representing Glover’s Marblehead regiment, of whom 40% were people of color, be it African-American, Native American, etc. He spoke of gratitude for knowing where we’ve been as a people, and how that has contributed to who we are today.

Ludger Balan (left) introduced us to the Sable Soldiers. Author’s collection.

Indeed the people re-enacting the Marblehead regiment had an intimate knowledge of the history of the regiment, from the motives behind the Marbleheaders joining the Revolutionary cause to the logistics of colonial warfare. When the crowd moved outside, stories were shared about the regiment and the battles it took part in (the most notable was the Battle of Trenton). Even the younger children were captivated by the stories!

Battlefield stories captured the crowd so well that the kids were more than willing to be a part of the cannon team demonstration. Author’s collection.

Finally, the soldiers gave us an unloaded demonstration of how some of their weapons worked. I won’t go into all the details here (please – see a demonstration of your local reenactors if you can), but I will share some of our modern expressions that stem from Revolutionary-era weaponry:

  • lock, stock and barrel
  • flash in the pan
  • half cocked
  • kick the bucket

In conclusion, I would say that my eyes have been opened about how all people have taken part in establishing our country. They may not have been in history books, but their names and roles are slowly being rediscovered by people like the Eckerts and the Sable Soldiers.

Encampment scenes. Author’s collection.

Encampment scenes. Author’s collection.

Encampment scenes. Author’s collection.

Encampment scenes. Author’s collection.

Encampment scenes. Author’s collection.

Encampment scenes. Author’s collection.

Honor Roll Project: Norwalk, CT – World War I (part 4)

In recognition of those who have served our country in the military, Heather Wilkinson Rojo of the Nutfield Genealogy blog started the Honor Roll Project. It’s an opportunity to publicly document the names on military memorials around the world, thus making them easily searchable on the internet for people who are looking for them!

WWI Memorial on the Norwalk Green. Author’s collection.

This is a continuation of the names on the World War I memorial on the green in Norwalk, CT (previous posts are here, here and here).  Below is the fourth panel and its transcription.

World War I Memorial. Norwalk, CT. Author’s collection.

1917 – THE WORLD WAR – 1919

FERGUSON LESTER R. FRIZZELL DUNCAN B. GOLDSTEIN FREDERICK HALLOREN JULIUS T. HICKEY WILLIAM T. JR.
FERGUSTON THEODORE FRIZZELL JOHN REEVES GORHAM WILLIAM N. HAMILTON ALBERT M. HIGHT FLETCHER
FERGUSON TREMONT H. FROST RUSSELL JR. GORHAM JOHN A. HAMILTON EDWARD W. HILL CHARLES L.
FERRINO LOUIS FUDGE HARRY C. GORMLEY LESTER F. HAMMOND BRADLEY B. HINCK NATHAN
FERRIS BENTLEY B. FULE JAMES GOTTLIEB LEO HANKS HAROLD S. HINES HUGH JR.
FERRIS VICTOR W. GOTTLIEB MORRIS HANKS WILLIAM J. HINSON HAROLD E.
FINCH RUSSELL W. GOULD EDGAR F. HANLON JOHN HIPSON CARYL B.
FINNEGAN EDWARD W. G GOULDEN ALLYN S. HANLON WILLIAM F. HIPSON HARRY H.
FIORE JAMES GABRIEL ANDREW GRACE FRANK J. HANNA HAROLD W. HOGOFIAN AVADIS
FISHER JOHN GAGE CLINTON H. GRAY ARTHUR S. HANNON JOHN PATRICK HOLLAND HENRY
FITCH HERBERT GAGER WARREN B. GRAY CHARLES LOUIS HARRIS ALFRED HOPSON CHARLES
FITELSON JACOB GALBO CALOGERO GRAY DONALD A. HARRIS ISRAEL HORAN EDWIN W.
FITZGERALD JOHN JAMES GALL DANIEL GRAY HORACE M. HARRIS LOUIS F. HORAN RICHARD J.
FITZGERALD JOSEPH M. GALLA FRANCESCON GRAY JOSEPH A. JR. HARRIS RICHARD T. HORAN THOMAS P.
FITZGERALD LEONARD GALLAGHER ANTHONY R. GRAY LOUIS S. HART PRESTON M. HORAN WILLIAM F.
FLAHERTY THOMAS F. GALLAGHER JAMES J. GREENBERG ARCHIE L. HARTY CHARLES A. HOTALING RAYMOND
FLOOD HOWARD GALYAS JOHN GREENWALD THEODORE F. HASLIN JOSEPH E. HOWARD GEORGE H.
FLYNN HARRY J. GAMBLE MINER L. GREENWOOD HAROLD A. HATCH FRANK D. HOWLEY THOMAS E.
FLYNN WALTON W. GANUN HARRY H. GREENWOOD LE GRAND HAUGH HARRY M. HOYT ARTHUR C.
FODOR ANDREW J. GARFIELD ARTHUR F. GREGORY M. GLOVER HAUGH JOHN DENNIS HOYT ELTON M.
FORBUSH BELDEN C. GARFIELD EARL B. GREGORY PERCIVAL R. HAVILAND CHARLES B. HUBBELL CLINTON C.
FORCELLINO DOMINIC GARFIELD JAMES F. GRIALTIERI FRANK HAVLICEK CHARLES A. HUBBELL WILLIAM H.
FOREIT JACK GATES HARRY GRIFFIN LOUIS HAWKINS RUSSELL S. HUDSON THOMAS H.
FOREN ALFRED EUGENE GATES IRA E. GRIFFIN VERNON F. HAYES EDWARD HUGHES ALBERT C.
FORIZ JOHN GAVIN JAMES F. GROESCHNER WILLIAM R. HAYES EDWARD T. HUGHES EDWARD C.
FORSYTHE GEORGE W. GAY FRANK GRUMBLY PATRICK A. HAYES JAMES H. HUGHES ELLIS
FOSTER CHARLES GEFFINO FRANK GRUMMAN LEWIS HAZLETT ROBERT HUGHES LESTER W.
FOSTER LEONARD J. GEORGE FRANCIS W. GUARNIERI JOHN J. HEALY JOSEPH HUGHEY ROBERT H.
FOSTER WALTER H. GEORGE ROBERT H. GUIDER JOHN VINCENT HEITZ PAUL HULL WILLIAM HENRY JR.
FOX JESSE S. GIANGUZZO CALOGERO GUILES HAROLD HELLANT JACOB HUNT DAVID
FOX WILLIAM A. GILBERT FRANK W. GUMBART EDWARD HUGO HELLANT LOUIS HUNT JOHN WILLIAM
FRANCARILLA ORAZIO GILBERT JOHN CLIFFORD GUMBART WILLIAM E. HEMMONE WILBUR W. HUNTINGTON ARTHUR F.
FRANCES WILLIAM G. GILBERT LELAND F. GUNTHER JOHN L. HENDRICKS EDWARD E. HUSSEY EDWARD H.
FRATINO JOSEPH GILCHRIST JAMES C. GUTHRIE CHESTER J. HENNESSY FREDERICK T. HYATT ELMER
FRATINO PATRICK GILLETTE WILLIAM B. HENRY MARTIN L. HYATT HARRY TRACEY
FRATTO FRANK GILMORE WALTER T. HENSON FREDERICK T. HYDE JOHN C.
FREDERICKS JAMES GLADSTONE WILLIAM C. H HERMON ALBERT HYLER BENJAMIN W.
FREUDENTHAL WALTER GLASSER DAVID HAASE EDWARD E. HERRING HERBERT W. HYNAN WILLIAM F.
FRIEDLANDER ROBERT GLEASON DANIEL H. HAIN OTTO HERTZ BENJAMIN H.
FRIEND JOHN JOSEPH GLEASON PHILIP R. HALACY DANIEL S. HERTZ JOSEPH
FRIEND MATTHEW F. GOLDSCHMIDT CHARLES HALACY JOHN JOSEPH HEVESSEY MICHAEL I
FRIZZELL CHARLES R. GOLDSCHMIDT SAMUEL HALL RUSSELL HICKEY THOMAS J. IRELAND HENRY J.

“WE HONOR THOSE WHO DO US HONOR”

A Second Look

Last week I began to draft a blog post about the mortgage deeds of Frank L. Colomy and how that shed some light on his life and his family. As with most of my posts, I decided to look over the source documents again more closely.

Boy, did that open a can of worms!

What I was originally going to post has been put aside as I realized that I really need to take a much closer and more detailed look at these deeds. Additionally, what I’ve found seems to indicate that I need to do more research, including some in-person visits to Lynn, Massachusetts, which I’m not sure when I’ll be able to get to do.

So the story will have to wait, but I can promise, it looks like a great one! For now the genealogical adage to go back and look at your documents again continues to hold true!

Rosener, Ann, photographer. Washington, D.C. OWI Office of War Information research workers. District of Columbia United States Washington D.C. Washington D.C, 1943. May. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2017851716/. (Accessed April 15, 2018.)

U-Turn: Great-grandfather John Biliunas

Way back when I wrote about my great-grandfather, I included a snippet from his World War I draft registration that stated his place of birth. For the life of me, I couldn’t figure out what it said, whether it began with an N or a V.

Portion of John Biliunas’ Draft Registration. Courtesy Ancestry.com.

Well, it turns out that it begins with an S! (If you look really carefully, you can see the very, very light line of the cursive S.) What I did was post that snippet on the Lithuanian Global Genealogy Facebook group, and someone was able to answer me right away. Apparently, the name of the town is Siauliai (I guess it has various spellings, including Siaule), which is in the northern portion of Lithuania and is the fourth largest city in Lithuania.

Cathedral of Siauliai. Courtesy of Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=81090)

Now, whether John was actually born in Siuliai or in a nearby village, I don’t know. I have yet to order his naturalization paperwork which may give me more information, but that is on my To Do List this year.